1. archosaurophilia:

When people tell me that T. rex can’t be scary if it isn’t restored as scaly, I laugh in their faces.
(Tyrannosaurus rex by John Conway)

    archosaurophilia:

    When people tell me that T. rex can’t be scary if it isn’t restored as scaly, I laugh in their faces.

    (Tyrannosaurus rex by John Conway)

  2. verybadpaleontologyjokes:

    melkior:

    send hELP

    See strangebiology for an explanation :)

  3. aurusallos:

    strangebiology:

    "Stan" the life-sized Tyrannosaurus Rex replica skeleton stands covered in pink flamingos at the Googleplex in Mountain View, California.  The dinosaur is intended to remind Googlers not to let the company fall behind the curve and become outdated.

    The final photo is a pile of cement with flamingos in it placed under Stan’s tail—making it look like he has eaten and pooped out the plastic birds.

    Ah, that’s who this guy is!

  4. antediluvianechoes:

Velociraptor and Juvenile Tarbosaurus by Guindagear
It’s hard to put a Protoceratops in a tree. It had taken Velociraptor nearly a half an hour to do so, tugging, pulling, hefting the heavy thing. The carcass was floppy and didn’t cooperate; the head shield got caught on a protrusion of bark; the limbs bumped and bounced against the tree like unsynced pendulums.
As soon as the dromaeosaur’s larder was filled—the dead Protoceratops balanced just right—the tarbosaurs came snooping. Dragging a dead dinosaur into a tree is not inconspicuous business, and the juveniles had heard and smelled enough to pique their curiosity and come trotting.
Velociraptor stared down at the two tyrannosaurs. It was safe—tarbosaurs couldn’t climb trees—but it was also stuck—tarbosaurs were excruciatingly patient (through juveniles admittedly less so than adults). They knew one bad tug from a misplaced bite might send the Protoceratops falling from the pantry. Or, if luck was particularly one-sided, the carcass and the Velociraptor could spill from the branch.
And so the three predators stared, occasionally pipping and fluting songs of aggression or ownership at each other, neither side backing away from the meal perched unsecurely in the tree.

    antediluvianechoes:

    Velociraptor and Juvenile Tarbosaurus by Guindagear

    It’s hard to put a Protoceratops in a tree. It had taken Velociraptor nearly a half an hour to do so, tugging, pulling, hefting the heavy thing. The carcass was floppy and didn’t cooperate; the head shield got caught on a protrusion of bark; the limbs bumped and bounced against the tree like unsynced pendulums.

    As soon as the dromaeosaur’s larder was filled—the dead Protoceratops balanced just right—the tarbosaurs came snooping. Dragging a dead dinosaur into a tree is not inconspicuous business, and the juveniles had heard and smelled enough to pique their curiosity and come trotting.

    Velociraptor stared down at the two tyrannosaurs. It was safe—tarbosaurs couldn’t climb trees—but it was also stuck—tarbosaurs were excruciatingly patient (through juveniles admittedly less so than adults). They knew one bad tug from a misplaced bite might send the Protoceratops falling from the pantry. Or, if luck was particularly one-sided, the carcass and the Velociraptor could spill from the branch.

    And so the three predators stared, occasionally pipping and fluting songs of aggression or ownership at each other, neither side backing away from the meal perched unsecurely in the tree.

  5. albertonykus:

killdeercheer:

A phylogeny of maniraptors - a gift for albertonykus for being awesome :D
Whipped up from recent avian phylogenies & Dr. Holtz’ Theropod cladograms. Green = extant lineages, brown = extinct. Yeah, the non-avian maniraptors are a little sparse, I apologize for that, but one of my main goals was to create a ‘consensus’ of multiple trees. The birds relationships are slowly stabilizing, but we have a long way to go.
Any inaccuracies or changes, please let me know.
Images from PhyloPic - http://phylopic.org/

I love this! You keep springing surprise gifts on me. XD

    albertonykus:

    killdeercheer:

    A phylogeny of maniraptors - a gift for albertonykus for being awesome :D

    Whipped up from recent avian phylogenies & Dr. Holtz’ Theropod cladograms. Green = extant lineages, brown = extinct. Yeah, the non-avian maniraptors are a little sparse, I apologize for that, but one of my main goals was to create a ‘consensus’ of multiple trees. The birds relationships are slowly stabilizing, but we have a long way to go.

    Any inaccuracies or changes, please let me know.

    Images from PhyloPic - http://phylopic.org/

    I love this! You keep springing surprise gifts on me. XD

  6. ladylover007:

    Tarchia & Tarbosaurus in the Hwaseong City Hall 1

    ©Hang-jae Lee

  7. indieintellectual:

    Today in AP Bio we were talking about how some animals have anti-freeze compounds in their blood to keep them warm, and this kid just leaned over to me and whispered,

     

    "Canadians"

  8. ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

    ewilloughby:

    Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

    The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

    Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

    Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

    Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

  9. perpetualartistsblock:

prehistoric-birds:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

cambriancupcake:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

prehistoric-birds:

Deinonychus antirrhopus by Nattawut Wongta

A little Willoughby-like, don’t you think?


I don’t think I’d accuse anyone of ripping her off, this form of hunting is one of the most recently proposed methods of dromaeosaurid hunting. It’s not just her idea.

The prey looks a little too similar to be much else. The posture, too, with the wings and tail.

For what it’s worth, I came across this picture while looking through Emily Willoughby’s favorites on her Deviantart, so apparently she’s cool with it.

Here’s my dumb analysis done for little-to-no reason other than because I could:The images are similar only in having Deinonychus and Zephyrosaurus in them during some point of RPR.
Wongta’s Deinonychus is standing on its prey with only its tarsals, while Willoughby’s Deinonychus has its metatarsals on top of the prey item as well.
The positioning of the body is different as well, with Wongta’s having the head closer to the ground and tail pointing near vertically and Willoughby’s having the the head raised upwards and the tail pointing outwards diagonally.
The feathering’s unique as well, Wongta’s Deinonychus having feathers close to the outline of the body (and what looks like an unfeathered underside) and an angular tail fan that runs all the way up the tail, and Willoughby’s Deinonychus being poofy with a bird-like lack of differentiation between neck and body, and having a rounder tail fan mostly around the end of the tail.
Even the prey’s different in that Wongta’s is pretty much dead, laying limp on the ground, while Willoughby’s is still alive and squirming.

    perpetualartistsblock:

    prehistoric-birds:

    lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

    cambriancupcake:

    lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

    prehistoric-birds:

    Deinonychus antirrhopus by Nattawut Wongta

    A little Willoughby-like, don’t you think?

    I don’t think I’d accuse anyone of ripping her off, this form of hunting is one of the most recently proposed methods of dromaeosaurid hunting. It’s not just her idea.

    The prey looks a little too similar to be much else. The posture, too, with the wings and tail.

    For what it’s worth, I came across this picture while looking through Emily Willoughby’s favorites on her Deviantart, so apparently she’s cool with it.

    Here’s my dumb analysis done for little-to-no reason other than because I could:The images are similar only in having Deinonychus and Zephyrosaurus in them during some point of RPR.

    Wongta’s Deinonychus is standing on its prey with only its tarsals, while Willoughby’s Deinonychus has its metatarsals on top of the prey item as well.

    The positioning of the body is different as well, with Wongta’s having the head closer to the ground and tail pointing near vertically and Willoughby’s having the the head raised upwards and the tail pointing outwards diagonally.

    The feathering’s unique as well, Wongta’s Deinonychus having feathers close to the outline of the body (and what looks like an unfeathered underside) and an angular tail fan that runs all the way up the tail, and Willoughby’s Deinonychus being poofy with a bird-like lack of differentiation between neck and body, and having a rounder tail fan mostly around the end of the tail.

    Even the prey’s different in that Wongta’s is pretty much dead, laying limp on the ground, while Willoughby’s is still alive and squirming.

  10. tyrannosaurslair:

    tyrannosaurslair:

    sciencetoastudent:

    weazulgrl:

    first set of museum photos~

    Where is this place?  Is it Nirvana/Heaven/Mecca/Valhalla?

    I think this is a museum in South Dakota. I forget where. I was there once a long time ago when I was really young.

    sciencetoastudent Found it! South Dakota Museum of Geology