1. zebrafeets-art:

    Some dinosaur studies.

  2. dinodorks:

Microraptor by Twarda8

    dinodorks:

    Microraptor by Twarda8

  3. paleoillustration:

    "During the Polish-Mongolian paleontological expedition to the Gobi Desert of Mongolia, in 1971, an articulated Velociraptor mongoliensis skeleton was found with hands and feet grasping a Protoceratops andrewsi. Evidence suggests that these two dinosaurs were indeed killed simultaneously, smothered by sand, possibly during a dune collapse. The active predatory nature of Velociraptor is graphically illustrated as it grasps its prey with its forelimbs, while kicking and raking the belly and chest with its hindlimbs. Protoceratops was discovered in a semi-erect stance with the Velociraptor’s right forelimb clutched between its jaws in a desperate fight for survival. Their discovery reveals a snapshot in time, of a life and death struggle, between these ancient adversaries.”

    Re-creation of the fossil by Black Hills Institute of Geological Research: “The skeleton casts we used, though more complete, are positioned in poses very similar to those of the original scene”

    Illustration by Peter Schouten

  4. I came out here to attack people, and honestly I am having such a good time right now.

    — Gregor Clegane, A Game of Thrones (via incorrectgotquotes)

  5. Art Prints by Chelsea Canny | Society6 →

    prehistoric-birds:

    devilegg:

    hi hi hi i made a society6 again!  i don’t even remember why i took it down in the first place.  i’ll be steadily adding more products and art in the next few days and whatnot.  have a nice day

    Support this wonderful person who paints wonderful dinos! (Warning for nudity, body horror and trypophobia in some of the other pieces.)

  6. crownedrose:

    Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

    The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

    These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

    I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

    You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

  7. amnhnyc:

At 5:45 pm, the last stragglers leave the Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda becomes very quiet…at least until 10 am the next day. This picture was taken by samthecobra for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

    amnhnyc:

    At 5:45 pm, the last stragglers leave the Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda becomes very quiet…at least until 10 am the next day. This picture was taken by samthecobra for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.

    Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

  8. paleoillustration:

    Dilophosaurus, Guanlong and Monolophosaurus by Cheung Chung Tat

  9. peregrinestar:

I did a thing in class today while the teacher was lecturing.

    peregrinestar:

    I did a thing in class today while the teacher was lecturing.